DESIGNING TIME    Currently, clock time structures and directs human behaviour. But are there alternative time systems that are better for our health, happiness and overall productivity?...

DESIGNING TIME 

 

Currently, clock time structures and directs human behaviour. But are there alternative time systems that are better for our health, happiness and overall productivity? Rather than being guided by the clock, Designing Time investigates new time systems and ways of living. Why are we always stressed? Why is there never enough time in the day to achieve what we set out to? Why are we always in a rush?

 

Today we are in a time crisis. The societal transformation from an agricultural to an urbanised 24/7 society, reflected in a move from natural time to the mechanical clock to the contemporary digital age, has influenced our daily biological and social rhythms. Modern technology has fostered an increasing temporal fragmentation, heralding an era of flexible time with ever more complex processes of synchronisation. These inhumane rhythms conflict with the natural rhythmicity of the human biological clock. When we turn our attention to understanding our body rhythms, new patterns and systems emerge: At what time of day am I most productive? Are my concentration levels more focused in the morning or afternoon? How much sleep should we be getting? There are no simple answers to these questions. We are all individual and require different rhythms and cycles to accommodate our needs. In Designing Time, we investigate this question. The gallery space acts as the clock itself and body rhythms become the essential criteria for spatial activity. It is an investigation into what uchronian (utopian for time) design thinking can be. It’s not a blueprint, but a way to rethink the complexity of time.

 

Artists and speakers include: Federico Campagna, Piotry Ceglarek, Tereza Červeńová, Ronnie Deleen, Demystification Committee, Claudia Dutson, Frances Hollis, Francisco Ibanez, Nayan Kulkarmi, Laura Lorenz, Debra Skene and Mále Uribe Fores.

 

Design Museum, 23-24 February 2019. The project is kindly supported by Savoir Beds, Funktion-One and the Royal College of Art.

 

Image credit: © Francisco Ibáñez Hantke /@estudioibanez  

 

 


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CIRCADIAN SPACE    The project explores the nature of temporality in relation to the human circadian rhythm (daily, bodily rhythm, from Latin circa and dies). The physicality of our bodies is the centre of...

CIRCADIAN SPACE 

 

The project explores the nature of temporality in relation to the human circadian rhythm (daily, bodily rhythm, from Latin circa and dies). The physicality of our bodies is the centre of consideration, with the human body clock as parameter for spatial development. The clock (societal time) structures and directs people’s behaviour. But rather than being guided by clock time, the space acts as the clock itself, with the human circadian phases becoming the essential criteria for spatial movement. Hours, minutes and seconds recede in importance as the space becomes the clock.

 

New production/commissioned by Z33 House for Contemporary Art for Istanbul Design Biennial 2018.

Upcoming show at LUMA Foundation Arles, France, 27 April – 26 May 2019

Helga Schmid in collaboration with Piotr Ceglarek, Tereza Červeňov, Malé Uribe Fores, Delfina Fantini van Ditmar and Michaela French. The project is kindly supported by LedFlex.


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CIRCADIAN DREAMS   Contemporary life is dictated by external time-givers (clock time, day-night rhythm), but what happens if we concentrate on our body and our individual time...

CIRCADIAN DREAMS

 

Contemporary life is dictated by external time-givers (clock time, day-night rhythm), but what happens if we concentrate on our body and our individual time signature?

 

Circadian Dreams is an installation developed as part of my ongoing artistic research on Uchronia (defined as temporal utopia). In this installation the space acts as a clock. Twelve minutes represent one circadian day of ~24 hours, each minute representing two hours. The light and sound scape relates to your body phases, with a bright blue tone that activates you, an intensive red-orange which makes you sleepy, and darkness which brings you to a sleep/dream state. The phases are based on peak daily times for logical reasoning, concentration, muscle strength, up to melatonin secretion and highest body temperature. The typology of a home, with kitchen and bedroom, becomes irrelevant when the bodily rhythm provides new criteria for dwelling.

 

Design Museum, on show until end of April 2019. In collaboration with: Marcela Uribe Forés (spatial design), Piotr Ceglarek (sound art and light design) and Dr Emily Candela (interviews). The project is kindly supported by Savoir Beds and Led Flex.

 

Image credit: © Francisco Ibáñez Hantke /@estudioibanez  


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